Tips for Success in Flexor Tendon, Finger Fracture, Dupuytren, and WALANT Mon, Oct 1 7:00-9:00 a.m.

There are 3 very solvable problems in hand surgery in 2018.

  1. Many surgeons are still not consistently getting good results in flexor tendon repair in clean lacerations in good patients. This course will enable surgeons to consistently get good results after flexor tendon repair. This is not just about WALNAT. This is also about venting up to 2cm of pulley including all of A3 + A4 or up to half of A2 in other cases to get better results and avoid tenolysis. It is about making 10-30% bulky repairs to decrease the risk of rupture. It is about half a fist of true active movement after surgery while avoiding full fist place and hold therapy.
  2. Many surgeons still produce stiff fingers after surgical reduction of finger fractures when this can be eliminated. This course will enable surgeons to eliminate many stiff fingers they are currently producing. This is not just about WALNAT. It is also about early protected movement starting 3-5 days after surgery like in flexor tendon repair. This is about K wires VS, plates. It is about relative motion flexion splinting to improve results with the common problem of extensor lag after surgery for finger fractures.
  3. Many surgeons have limited early experience with WALANT hand surgery. This course will help take many surgeons to the next level with advanced tips in WALANT surgery to improve results and decrease complications in Dupuytrens, carpal tunnel, and cubital tunnel surgery. This is not just about WALANT. It is also about relative motion flexion splinting to improve extensor lag after Dupuytren’s surgery and Xiaflex. It is about recognizing and treating lacertus syndrome as a cause of persistent numbness after carpal tunnel release. It is about improved ways to perform WALANT cubital tunnel release…of the overall subject.

Following this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Consistently get good results after flexor tendon repair in clean lacerations in cooperative patients.
  2. Perform WALANT lacertus release for some patients with persistent numbness after carpal tunnel release.
  3. Decrease the number of stiff fingers after finger fracture surgery.
  4. Treat extensor lag after Dupuytrens surgery with relative motion flexion splints.
  5. Do WALANT cubital tunnel release with the patients prone or elbow over the belly for those with shoulder pain.

Program Subject to Change.

Accreditation: The American Society of Plastic Surgeons® (ASPS) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation: The ASPS designates this live activity for a maximum of 2 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.